Tag: personal law

Why make a will?

If you die without leaving a valid Will, then the law decides how your estate is distributed, regardless of any wishes you had or promises you made during your lifetime.

The Intestacy Rules

If you are married, or registered civil partners, and have children

If your estate is worth less than £250,000 then your husband or wife gets everything.

If your estate is worth more than £250,000 then your husband or wife will get £250,000, all personal belongings and one half of everything over this sum. Your children would be entitled to the other half of the sum over £250,000, equally between them if more than one, held on trust until they are 18. Should any of your children die before you, then their children would be entitled to take their parent’s share

If you are married or civil partners and have no children

Your husband or wife receives your entire estate.

If you are not married but have had children

Your estate will be shared between your children equally but it will be held on trust until they are 18.

If you are not married and have no children but do have surviving relatives

Your estate goes to your relatives, depending on who survives you, in this order of priority: parents; brothers / sisters; half brothers / sisters; grandparents;
aunts / uncles; half aunts / uncles.

If you are not married and have no other relatives

Your estate will go to the Crown.

The intestacy rules do not recognise “common law” partners, and “children” includes adopted and illegitimate children but not stepchildren.

Everyone should have Will, but it is of exceptional importance if:

  • you have been married more than once;
  • you have young children for whom guardians should be appointed;
  • you want to provide for a child who is not your own;
  • you are separated or divorcing;
  • you run a business and wish to plan for succession.

Making a Will is the only way to make sure that your wishes are carried out after your death. We offer a bespoke Will-making service, and we ensure that we take the time to discuss all aspects of your assets and potential estate before we start to prepare your Will. We are happy to answer any questions you may have relating to inheritance tax and trusts, legacies and residuary gifts. We will provide you with a draft of your Will and explain it fully to you, giving you the peace of mind of knowing that your estate will be handled in the way you wish if the worst were to happen.

To discuss this and to obtain more information contact:
Emily Payne at Dickins Hopgood Chidley Solicitors,
The Old School House, 42 High Street, Hungerford, Berkshire, RG17 0NF 01488 683555

What to do when someone dies

There are many matters which require consideration at this difficult time. This summary is to assist you in dealing with the first steps.

Immediate steps:

  1. Register the death at the register office – 01635 279230 (West Berkshire) or 0300 003 4569 (Wiltshire)
  2. Find out if there were any specific wishes about funeral arrangements (this may be in the Will);
  3. Organise the funeral;
  4. Notify friends, relatives and employers / employees
  5. Put notice in the newspaper.

Practical Matters:

  1. Cancel all deliveries (papers etc.);
  2. Remove valuables from his/her home;
  3. Redirect mail;
  4. Inform the building, contents and car (if appropriate) insurers;
  5. Arrange for the immediate welfare of any pets. The Deceased may have provided for their long term care in his/her Will

Collect the following information:

  1. The Will;
  2. National Insurance Number, tax office and reference number;
  3. Date and place of birth, and date and place of marriage or civil partnership.
Will, Personal attorney  in Berkshire

Notify:

  1. The executor of the Will, and if there is no Will, an administrator of the estate will need to be appointed in accordance with the probate rules;
  2. If you need any help speak to a solicitor

Contact in due course:

  1. Banks and building societies;
  2. Department for Work and Pensions if receiving any benefits;
  3. Pension providers;
  4. Solicitor and accountant
  5. Deceased’s tax office;
  6. Landlord if deceased lived in rented property;
  7. Local authority – council tax, parking permit or if a blue badge was held for disabled parking;
  8. Care providers (Social Services or private provider);
  9. Insurance companies: travel, private health care, etc;
  10. Life insurance companies;
  11. Mortgage provider;
  12. H.P. or loan companies, credit and store card providers;
  13. Utility companies – water, electricity, gas and phone;
  14. TV/Internet providers;
  15. DVLA and passport office;
  16. Clubs and associations;
  17. Dentist or other healthcare
    providers;
  18. Creditors – anyone they owed
    money to;
  19. Debtors – anyone who owed
    them money;
  20. Digital account providers –
    email, social media, Amazon,
    eBay etc.

A solicitor can assist in notifying all the relevant organisations and obtaining the information required to apply for the Grant of Probate. Don’t forget, we are here to help as much as you would like.

To discuss this and to obtain more information contact:
Emily Payne at Dickins Hopgood Chidley Solicitors,
The Old School House, 42 High Street, Hungerford, Berkshire, RG17 0NF 01488 683555

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